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dc.contributor.authorGillis, Jennifer Chmiel
dc.contributor.otherMacDonald, Saundra
dc.contributor.otherSpear, Emily
dc.contributor.otherMcClellan, Ann K.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-05T19:20:53Z
dc.date.available2021-04-05T19:20:53Z
dc.date.issued7/28/2020
dc.identifierpsu-etd-192
dc.identifier.urihttps://summit.plymouth.edu/handle/20.500.12774/400
dc.descriptionThe purpose of this ex post facto study was to investigate New Hampshire (NH) public school principal retention and tile relationships of gender. grade level and task overload. The current role of a principal requires a dynamic sci of strengths and skills to lead their school community in a manner that produces positive student and staff growth (Fullan 2014). This study is essential, at this time, as the mean for national principal retention is 4.2 years with NH falling to a mean of 3.6 years (Goldring & Taie, 2018; Principal retention, 2010-2020). The current national and state means are below the necessary five years of principal tenure to effect school change (Fullan, 201, 2015; Miller, 2015). The study consisted of the use of a secondary data set, NH School Leader Survey (Foster, 2018) to examine the role of gender, grade level, isolation and task overload on tenure and likelihood of choosing school leadership in the future. The study sample was 428 current NH school principals or 55% of the available 519 NH principals during the 2018 school year. The findings of the study suggest the NH female secondary principals were the least likely to choose school leadership in the future in addition to yielding a mean of 2.7 years which is below the 3.29 national mean. The findings for female middle and high school principals also showed that they were less likely to meet with district
dc.description.abstractElectronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectNew Hampshire public schools
dc.subjectprincipal retention
dc.titlePublic school principal retention in the state of New Hampshire and the relationship of gender, grade level, isolation and task overload
dc.typetext
dc.typeelectronic thesis or dissertation
dc.contributor.chairLeBrun, Marcel
etdms.degree.disciplineDepartment of Educational Leadership, Learning, and Curriculum
etdms.degree.grantorPlymouth State University
etdms.degree.leveldoctoral
etdms.degree.nameDoctor of Education


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