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dc.contributor.advisorAviles, Lourdes B.
dc.contributor.authorHohman, Christopher Codi
dc.contributor.otherMiller, Sam T.
dc.contributor.otherHoffman, Eric G.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-10T19:39:35Z
dc.date.available2021-09-10T19:39:35Z
dc.date.issued21-May
dc.identifierpsu-etd-206
dc.identifier.urihttps://summit.plymouth.edu/handle/20.500.12774/412
dc.descriptionCloud albedo is primarily a function of the cloud's microphysical composition. Clouds comprised of small liquid droplets are more efficient at reflecting solar radiation than ones made-up of larger droplets and/or ice crystals. The droplet composition is a function of its temperature, which corresponds to the altitude of the cloud. Ambient aerosols can have an indirect effect on the size and quantity of droplets present in a cloud. The purpose of this study was quantifying changes in cloud albedo with height, time of year, and ambient aerosol optical depth. Our study utilized upward facing pyranometers from the AERONET station at the Goddard Space Flight Center to calculate cloud albedo. We used cloud height observations from automated and manned stations to find the corresponding cloud heights. We found that on average, low clouds reflected 418 W/m2 and reduced solar flux by 55%, middle clouds reduced radiation by 332 W/m2 and reflected 46%, high clouds reduced solar flux by 125 W/m2 and reflected 20% of incoming radiation.
dc.description.abstractElectronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleRelationship of Seasonal Cloud Albedo with Height and Ambient Aerosol Quantities
dc.typetext
etdms.degree.disciplineDepartment of Atmospheric Science and Chemistry
etdms.degree.grantorPlymouth State University
etdms.degree.levelmasters
etdms.degree.nameMaster of Science in Applied Meteorology


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