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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Erin Mooney
dc.contributor.otherNorris, Kathleen
dc.contributor.otherWronowski, Meredith
dc.contributor.otherMcClellan, Ann K.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-10T19:40:23Z
dc.date.available2021-09-10T19:40:23Z
dc.date.issued8/3/2020
dc.identifierpsu-etd-205
dc.identifier.urihttps://summit.plymouth.edu/handle/20.500.12774/420
dc.descriptionThe purpose of this study was to determine how teachers seek and experience empowerment in high-poverty, urban school and how empowerment increases retention. This study included a review of literature to provide context on empowerment and retention in high-poverty, urban schools. To further analyze the idea of teacher empowerment and retention within high-poverty, urban schools, a qualitative, grounded theory study was completed. Through the process of remotely interviewing teachers in middle schools within Lawrence, Massachusetts, data were collected and analyzed on reasons teachers continue to stay in high-poverty, urban schools based on their experience working within these settings. Findings identified teachers feeling empowered when having autonomy over their curriculum, and having the ability to provide authentic input into school-wide decisions.
dc.description.abstractElectronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleA Grounded Theory Study on Teacher Empowerment and Retention in High-poverty, Urban Schools
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.chairBenedetti, Christopher
etdms.degree.disciplineDepartment of Educational Leadership, Learning, and Curriculum
etdms.degree.grantorPlymouth State University
etdms.degree.leveldoctoral
etdms.degree.nameDoctor of Education in Higher Education


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