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dc.contributor.advisorBerry, Ann
dc.contributor.authorSimonton, Deborah
dc.contributor.otherPatenaude, Kathleen
dc.contributor.otherPuglisi, Nancy
dc.contributor.otherMcClellan, Ann
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-03T17:22:00Z
dc.date.available2022-01-03T17:22:00Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-22
dc.identifier.urihttps://summit.plymouth.edu/handle/20.500.12774/429
dc.descriptionAN ASTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION OF Deborah L. Simonton for the degree of Doctor of Education in Higher Education Presented on November 22, 2021 Title: From Simulation Anxiety to COVID-19 Anxiety: The Perceptions of Pre licensure Nursing Students to Utilizing Brief Mindfulness Interventions as a Coping Mechanism Abstract approved: Ann Berry, PhD., Dissertation Committee Chair The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of undergraduate, pre licensure nursing students, in a public university in the Northeast, utilizing brief mindfulness interventions as a method of coping with the anxiety associated with high fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Fifty-seven students enrolled in an original pre-test post-test quantitative study, utilizing the State-Trait Anxiety inventory to assess the possible correlation between Koru mindfulness minutes practiced and anxiety associated with HFPS. In March of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic had a sudden, profound effect on nursing education resulting in face-to-face classes being converted to online formats, and simulation and clinical education converting to virtual learning. At the same time, participation in the brief mindfulness interventions dropped and the researcher pivoted to exploring qualitative responses from participants. The researcher recruited 16 of the 57 students, who had agreed to be in the original study, to respond to written questions designed to capture their perceptions of the utility of brief FROM SIMULATION ANXIETY TO COVID-19 ANXIETY mindfulness interventions in coping with the anxiety associated with HFPS during the COVID-19 pandemic. Their written responses were coded, categorized, and themes emerged related to the two research questions: What are the perceptions of undergraduate nursing students regarding brief mindfulness interventions? How has COVID-19 impacted the use of mindfulness interventions? Responses revealed that participants’ perceived value in learning and utilizing brief mindfulness strategies to manage anxiety. Subthemes included perceived value related to HFPS, and perceived value related to being a prelicensure nursing student. Participants expressed feeling overwhelmed related to curricular changes, social changes, and fear. A second theme emerged related to coping strategies utilized during this time. These promising results indicate that brief mindfulness interventions have the potential to be a tool for prelicensure students to utilize in managing the anxiety associated with various aspects of the nursing curriculum. The practical implications for integrating these findings into a pre-licensure nursing curriculum are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectpre-licensure nursing students, simulation anxiety, brief mindfulness techniques, COVID-19 and nursing educationen_US
dc.titleFrom Simulation Anxiety to COVID-19 Anxiety: The Perceptions of Pre licensure Nursing Students to Utilizing Brief Mindfulness Interventions as a Coping Mechanism.en_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairBerry, Ann
etdms.degree.disciplineDepartment of Educational Leadership, Learning, and Curriculumen_US
etdms.degree.grantorPlymouth State Universityen_US
etdms.degree.levelDoctorateen_US
etdms.degree.nameDoctor of Education in Learning, Leadership, and Communityen_US


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